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Force India continue to pioneer nose design with new VJM10

Force India have continued to push the limits of Formula 1 regulations with the launch of their 2017 car, the VJM10, this morning at Silverstone, Britain.

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This photo clearly shows how Force India have pioneered with their car design – showing the longer nose design.

Force India have continued to push the limits of Formula 1 regulations with the launch of their 2017 car, the VJM10, this morning at Silverstone, Britain.

The team has continued to show ingenuity in the design of their nose-cone, one of the most visually customizable areas of a chassis.

With a complete overhaul of regulation for 2017, the previous three teams to reveal their cars, Williams, Sauber and Renault, have all decided to stick with the familiar short, small and stubby nose design. However, Force India’s is a longer extension, showing a clear unique vision.

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This is a direct comparison between the short stubby Renault RS17 nose (left) and Force India’s longer nose design.

 

This isn’t the first time the team have stepped outside the square with car design. In 2015, they introduced ‘nostrils’ to their car in an effort to increase their aerodynamics. 2016 was a continuation of said design and ultimately the car proved to be unchallenged in the mid-field, eventually finishing ahead of arch rivals, Williams-Martini Racing.

Vijay Mallya, the Team Principal of Force India, would like to keep that form going, saying, “Simply repeating our performance level of 2016 will be a big task in itself.

“I don’t want to set goals or targets other than to say that we intend to maintain the momentum we have built up in recent years and carry it into the new season,” he said.

The VJM10 will make its on-track debut when the first pre-season test in Barcelona gets underway on the 27th of February.

 

Steven Walton is an 18-year-old Journalism Student at the Ara Institute of Canterbury. He previously attended St Andrew's College in Christchurch, where he excelled at History and Classical Studies. Steven is the Editor-in-Chief at Green Flag F1 and spends most of his days living, breathing, and immersing in the Formula 1 world.

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